Commercial Litigation UK

  • July 09, 2024

    Supermarket Chain Iceland Fights To Nix Kebab Supplier's TM

    Grocery giant Iceland has hit back at a trademark infringement claim from a kebab meat supplier, saying the meat company's logo is too vague and its trademark protection should be revoked.

  • July 09, 2024

    Sony Music Unit Says Infringement Of TikTok Hit An Error

    A Sony Music unit has told a U.K. record label that its version of a remake of the 2008 hit "Ride It" unintentionally infringed the original track and that the label's damages claim is "excessive and unjustified."

  • July 09, 2024

    Lawyer Accused Of Making False Mishcon Claims On Iran TV

    The solicitors' watchdog told a disciplinary tribunal on Tuesday that a high-profile criminal defense lawyer recklessly made false statements about Mishcon de Reya LLP while appearing on an antisemitic show on an Iranian state-owned media channel.

  • July 09, 2024

    Chief Constable Loses Sex Bias Case Over Work Vendetta

    A senior police officer in northwest England discriminated against a personal assistant by making her collateral damage in a vendetta he had against a rival female officer, an employment tribunal has ruled.

  • July 09, 2024

    Ex-Axiom Ince Staff Win Claims Over Missing Payments

    A tribunal has ordered Axiom Ince to hand over a total of £11,500 ($14,700) in redundancy and unclaimed holiday payments to three former members of staff after the law firm collapsed in October.

  • July 09, 2024

    Malaysian Investor Fights To Block €36M Claim At Top Court

    A Malaysian businessman urged the U.K.'s top court on Tuesday to rule that a creditor should be blocked from bringing a €36 million ($39 million) claim against him because it already won a declaration in an earlier action pursuing the debts. 

  • July 09, 2024

    LetterOne Fights National Security Sale Of Broadband Firm

    An investment group backed by Russian oligarchs has launched the first legal challenge to a decision under the National Security and Investment Act, claiming on Tuesday that the government unfairly forced the sale of a regional broadband provider at a "substantial financial loss."

  • July 09, 2024

    BBC Rebuffed In Effort To Cut Costs Of £20B Pension Scheme

    An attempt by the British Broadcasting Corp. to reduce benefits for employees enrolled in its £19.8 billion ($25.4 billion) pension scheme has been rebuffed as the Court of Appeal ruled in favor of members on Tuesday.

  • July 09, 2024

    Sports Broadcaster Sued For Fraud In Failed Streaming Deal

    Liquidators of a licensing company have sued a broadcasting chief after their autosport streaming deal turned sour, telling a court he lied about his ability to sell streaming subscriptions in U.S. prisons to entice the company to hand over the licensing rights.

  • July 09, 2024

    Justices Trim Scope Of Warranties In Construction Contracts

    The U.K. Supreme Court found on Tuesday that a collateral warranty given by a building contractor to the tenant of a care home was not a "construction contract" and therefore cannot be subject to adjudication.

  • July 09, 2024

    Thomas Cook Creditors To Get Back £280M After Asset Sale

    Creditors of Thomas Cook will receive a total of £280 million ($358 million) before the end of September after the senior civil servant overseeing the liquidation sold all available assets owned by the collapsed travel giant, according to the Insolvency Service.

  • July 08, 2024

    Mining Co. Looks To Annul Romania's Arbitration Fees

    Canadian mining company Gabriel Resources Ltd., which is facing a major cash crunch after losing its $4.4 billion arbitration against Romania, said Monday it has filed an application requesting the annulment of a tribunal's costs award to the country.

  • July 08, 2024

    MoD Accepts 'Duty Of Care' In Hearing Loss Suit

    The Ministry of Defence agreed Monday to uphold its "duty of care" to thousands of active and former service members who are now set to receive compensation for hearing loss from their time in the military.

  • July 08, 2024

    FX Fund Says Investments Wiped Out By Legit Trading Losses

    An investment fund that lost a client's money trading on the foreign exchange market has denied running a scam, claiming it owes the investor nothing because the losses were part of normal day-to-day trading.

  • July 08, 2024

    Trader Denies Knowingly Making False Cum-Ex Trades

    A British trader who has been convicted of defrauding Denmark in a sham tax reclaim scheme on Monday testified before a London court that he did not knowingly make false trades in order to make fraudulent tax refund applications, in a landmark £1.4 billion ($1.8 billion) trial.

  • July 08, 2024

    Council's Whistleblowing Investment Head Unfairly Sacked

    An English city council official has won his whistleblowing detriment and unfair dismissal claim against his former employer after he was fired for conduct unrelated to his concerns that a fellow director encouraged a contractor to bring legal action against the council.

  • July 08, 2024

    Aga Proves Converted Cooker Marketing Infringed TM

    Stove manufacturer Aga has won its claim for trademark infringement against a company selling electronic conversion kits for its ovens, persuading a London court that its marketing wrongly suggested that the two businesses were linked.

  • July 08, 2024

    NIG Sued By Asset Manager Over £4M Fire Destruction

    Parker Asset Management Ltd. has sued a subsidiary of U K Insurance Ltd. for allegedly failing to honor an insurance policy after a fire destroyed one of the firm's commercial properties and resulted in a loss of about £4.2 million ($4.5 million).

  • July 05, 2024

    Truckmakers Can Use Pass-On Defense In Price-Fixing Case

    European truck manufacturers can argue that local U.K. authorities suing them over a price-fixing cartel passed the inflated costs allegedly paid for vehicles on to residents through tax and service charges, a tribunal ruled Thursday.

  • July 05, 2024

    Legal Teams' Costs Slashed By £253M In UK Dieselgate Case

    Legal teams involved in unprecedented U.K "Dieselgate" vehicle emissions tests litigation had more than £250 million ($320 million) of their budgets slashed on Friday after a High Court judge ruled that the estimated costs were "out of all proportion".

  • July 05, 2024

    Xiaomi Won't Get Interim 4G Patent License From Panasonic

    A London court on Friday declined to award Xiaomi an interim license to use Panasonic's 4G tech ahead of the companies' upcoming patent trial, ruling that Panasonic is not acting in bad faith by holding out for better terms.

  • July 05, 2024

    Bitcoin Fraudster Gets £1.5M Of Assets Frozen

    A London court on Friday froze assets worth over £1.5 million ($1.9 million) belonging to Craig Wright, the man who falsely claimed to be the inventor of bitcoin, to cover the costs of a cryptocurrency podcaster who had to defend against Wright's defamation allegation.

  • July 05, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen collapsed sports television company Arena Television hit Bank of Scotland and Lloyds Bank with a claim, James Vorley, the Deutsche Bank metals trader convicted of fraud, sue his former employer, and journalist John Ware file a defamation claim against Pink Floyd band member Roger Waters and Al Jazeera Media Network. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • July 05, 2024

    Matrix KC Richard Hermer Tapped For Attorney General

    Matrix Chambers' human rights barrister Richard Hermer KC will serve as the U.K.'s attorney general in a surprise appointment from newly-elected Prime Minister Keir Starmer late Friday.

  • July 05, 2024

    Signature Litigation Partner Elected To ICC

    An international arbitration partner at Signature Litigation has been elected to the International Chamber of Commerce to represent Ethiopia for the next three years.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    PACCAR Should Be 1st Step To Regulating Litigation Funders

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    Rather than reversing the U.K. Supreme Court's well-reasoned judgment in PACCAR v. Competition Appeal Tribunal, imposing a regulatory regime on litigation funders in parity with that of lawyers, legislators should build upon it to create a more transparent, competitive and fairer funding industry, says Rosa Curling at Foxglove.

  • Patent Plausibility Uncertainty Persists, EPO Petition Shows

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    While a recent petition for review at the European Patent Office — maintaining that the Board of Appeal misapplied the Enlarged Board of Appeal's order on whether a patent is "plausible" — highlights the continued uncertainty surrounding the plausibility concept, the outcome could provide useful guidance on the interpretation of orders, say lawyers at Finnegan.

  • In Int'l Arbitration Agreements, Be Clear About Governing Law

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    A trilogy of recent cases in the English High Court and Court of Appeal highlight the importance of parties agreeing to explicit choice of law language at the outset of an arbitration agreement in order to avoid costly legal skirmishes down the road, say lawyers at Faegre Drinker.

  • Risks The Judiciary Needs To Be Aware Of When Using AI

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    Recently published judiciary service guidance aims to temper reliance on AI by court staff in their work, and with ever-increasing and evolving technology, such tools should be used for supplementary assistance rather than as a replacement for already existing judicial research tools, says Philip Sewell at Shepherd & Wedderburn.

  • Post Office Scandal Stresses Key Directors Duties Lessons

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    The Post Office scandal, involving hundreds of wrongful convictions of subpostmasters based on an IT failure, offers lessons for company directors on the magnitude of the impact that a failure to fulfill their duties can have on employees and the company, says Simon Goldberg at Simons Muirhead.

  • Employer Tips For Handling Data Subject Access Requests

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    As employers face numerous employee data-subject access requests — and the attendant risks of complaints to the Information Commissioner's Office — issues such as managing deadlines and sifting through data make compliance more difficult, highlighting the importance of efficient internal processes and clear communication when responding to a request, say Gwynneth Tan and Amy Leech at Shoosmiths.

  • Top Court Hire Car Ruling Affects 3rd-Party Negligence Cases

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    The U.K. Supreme Court's recent decision in Armstead v. Royal & Sun Alliance, finding that an insurer was responsible for lost car rental income after an accident, has significant implications for arguing economic loss and determining burden of proof in third-party negligence cases that trigger contractual liabilities, say lawyers at Macfarlanes.

  • Bribery Class Action Ruling May Revive Bifurcated Processes

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    The Court of Appeal's recent decision allowing the representative bribery action in Commission Recovery v. Marks & Clerk offers renewed hope for claimants to advance class claims using a bifurcated process amid its general absence as of late, say Jon Gale and Justin Browne at Ashurst.

  • Ocado Appeal Outcome Will Gauge UPC Transparency

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    As the sole Unified Patent Court case concerning third-party requests for court records, the forthcoming appeal decision in Ocado v. Autostore will hopefully set out a clear and consistent way to handle reasoned requests, as access to nonconfidential documents will surely lead to more efficient conduct of proceedings, says Tom Brazier at EIP.

  • The Good, The Bad And The New Of The UK Sanctions Regime

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    Almost six years after the Sanctions and Money Laundering Act was introduced, the U.K. government has published a strategy paper that outlines its focus points and unveils potential changes to the regime, such as a new humanitarian exception for financial sanctions, highlighting the rapid transformation of the U.K. sanctions landscape, says Josef Rybacki at WilmerHale.

  • Unpacking The Building Safety Act's Industry Overhaul

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    Recent updates to the Building Safety Act introduce a new principal designer role and longer limitation periods for defects claims, ushering in new compliance challenges for construction industry stakeholders to navigate, as well as a need to affirm that their insurance arrangements provide adequate protection, say Zoe Eastell and Zack Gould-Wilson at RPC.

  • Prompt Engineering Skills Are Changing The Legal Profession

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    With a focus on higher-value work as repetitive tasks are delegated to artificial intelligence, legal roles are set to become more inspiring, and lawyers need not fear the rising demand for prompt engineers that is altering the technology-enabled legal environment, say Eric Crawley, Shah Karim and Paul O’Hagan at Epiq Legal.

  • Opinion

    UK Whistleblowers Flock To The US For Good Reason

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    The U.K. Serious Fraud Office director recently brought renewed attention to the differences between the U.K. and U.S. whistleblower regimes — differences that may make reporting to U.S. agencies a better and safer option for U.K. whistleblowers, and show why U.K. whistleblower laws need to be improved, say Benjamin Calitri and Kate Reeves at Kohn Kohn.

  • 4 Legal Privilege Lessons From Dechert Disclosure Ruling

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    The Court of Appeal's recent decision in Al Sadeq v. Dechert LLP, finding that evidence may have been incorrectly withheld, provides welcome clarification of the scope of legal professional privilege, including the application of the iniquity exception, says Tim Knight at Travers Smith.

  • BT Case May Shape UK Class Action Landscape

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    The first opt-out collective action trial commenced in Le Patourel v. BT in the U.K. Competition Appeal Tribunal last month, regarding BT's abuse of dominance by overcharging millions of customers, will likely provide clarification on damages and funder returns in collective actions, which could significantly affect the class action regime, say lawyers at RPC.

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