Commercial Contracts

  • July 11, 2024

    Clemson Can't Toss ACC's Media Rights Suit From NC Court

    Clemson University has come up short in its attempt to end the Atlantic Coast Conference's suit over media rights and conference exit fees after a North Carolina state judge ruled that as an ACC member, the university had given conference leaders the right to sue in the state.

  • July 11, 2024

    Chancery Fast-Tracks Blue Cross Data Co. Suit, Denies TRO

    An independent licensee of Blue Cross Blue Shield Association that accused a customer of sharing confidential data with industry competitor Cigna Corp. got its Delaware Chancery Court lawsuit fast-tracked Thursday but failed to get immediate injunctive relief because the harms it alleged were too "speculative."

  • July 11, 2024

    Top Atty At Army Center Of Military History Joins Shook Hardy

    The former chief counsel for the U.S. Army Center of Military History has joined Shook Hardy & Bacon LLP as co-chair of the firm's growing art law practice, the firm announced Thursday.

  • July 11, 2024

    Bally Sports Parent Axes TV Deal With NHL's Dallas Stars

    A Texas bankruptcy judge on Thursday approved a request by Bally Sports parent company Diamond Sports Group to reject a broadcast agreement with the NHL's Dallas Stars, the latest professional team to part ways with DSG.

  • July 10, 2024

    Nasdaq Says It's Immune To SPAC's 'Racial Animus' Claims

    The Nasdaq Stock Market has asked a Brooklyn federal judge to toss claims it "arbitrarily and capriciously" derailed a minority-led special purpose acquisition company's plans, arguing in a Wednesday filing that it's immune to such claims as a self-regulatory organization.

  • July 10, 2024

    Medical Imaging Co. Looking To Vacate 'Tainted' Award

    A New York federal court has unsealed medical imaging company Molecular Dynamics Ltd.'s still-pending 2022 petition seeking to vacate an allegedly fraudulent arbitral award favoring its former partner in a project to develop cameras in the field of nuclear medicine, revealing more information about the dispute.

  • July 10, 2024

    Chiquita Says Ecuador Banana Co. Prez Must Be Jailed

    Chiquita Brands International asked a Florida federal court Wednesday to issue an arrest warrant for the president of an Ecuadorian banana exporter that has ignored court orders requiring the exporter to hand over financial information needed to execute a $6.9 million international arbitral award to Chiquita.

  • July 10, 2024

    Airgun Co. Drops Counterclaim Against Swedish Supplier

    An American airgun seller has dropped its counterclaim alleging in the North Carolina Business Court that its Swedish supplier sabotaged a business relationship as part of a deal to end a court battle between the two former partners.

  • July 10, 2024

    Cheech And Chong's Co. Hits Colo. Cannabis Cos. With IP Suit

    Cheech and Chong's Cannabis Co. has filed an infringement lawsuit against a Colorado entrepreneur, accusing him of using the comedy duo's likeness after being explicitly warned not to, according to a lawsuit filed in Colorado state court.

  • July 10, 2024

    Ex-CEO Of Mogul-Tied Co. Fired For Failures, Fraud Suit Says

    A European IT company tied to convicted mogul Greg Lindberg struck back against a lawsuit by its former CEO who alleges he was fired abruptly, accusing the former executive of shirking his leadership duties in a counterclaim.

  • July 10, 2024

    Utility Locating Co.'s Ex-CEO Sues For Severance After Firing

    The former CEO of a utility locating company in North Carolina is suing for severance after he was unexpectedly fired, saying he was never told the grounds for his termination and should be paid his base salary plus a bonus under the terms of his employment contract.

  • July 10, 2024

    Thoma Bravo's Qualtrics Bid Fell Short, SAP Tells Chancery

    Thoma Bravo LP may have offered $1.2 billion more than Silver Lake Management to buy Qualtrics International Inc. from software company SAP SE in 2023, but other aspects of the bid were less attractive than Silver Lake's $12.5 billion offer, an attorney for SAP directors told Delaware's Court of Chancery on Wednesday.

  • July 10, 2024

    NJ Justices OK Class Waivers Sans Arbitration Mandates

    Class action waivers don't require a mandatory arbitration provision to be enforceable, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled Wednesday, while also warning that waivers deemed unconscionable for other reasons may be invalidated.

  • July 10, 2024

    Insurer Must Face Claims In Penile Implant Coverage Suit

    An insurer can't escape a suit brought by a urologist and his practice seeking coverage for a proposed class action over a penile enlargement implant and procedure, a California federal court ruled Wednesday, saying it's too early to conclude that the underlying action doesn't assert potentially covered claims.

  • July 10, 2024

    Intel Asks Del. Court To Affirm It Has License To VLSI Patents

    Intel has launched a suit in Delaware federal court asking for an order that it already has a license to various VLSI patents, the latest in a sprawling legal fight between the two parties over microchips.

  • July 10, 2024

    Margolis Edelstein Fights Bid To Revive Malpractice Suit

    An attorney representing Margolis Edelstein told the Delaware Supreme Court on Wednesday that an insurer's malpractice suit against the law firm shouldn't be revived as the firm's purported negligence wasn't the reason the insurer settled an underlying dispute for $1.2 million.

  • July 10, 2024

    Walmart IP Foe May Face $2.9M Penalty After Jury Win Tossed

    Counsel for a food tech startup that saw its $115 million patent infringement verdict against Walmart nixed may be ordered to pay the retail giant's $2.9 million legal bill due to misrepresentations about a key piece of evidence, an Arkansas federal judge said.

  • July 10, 2024

    Pa. Judge Skeptical Of Pausing FTC's Noncompete Ban

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Wednesday seemed hesitant to grant a tree services company's request to halt the Federal Trade Commission's recent ban on noncompete agreements, as attorneys for the company struggled to point to concrete harms it would suffer if the ban were to take effect as scheduled.

  • July 10, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Rethink Arbitration Denial In ERISA Suit

    The Second Circuit declined to reconsider its May ruling that a group of financial services companies can't compel individual arbitration of a proposed class action accusing them of overcharging an employee stock ownership plan, rejecting one company's argument that the panel unfairly displayed "hostility to arbitration."

  • July 10, 2024

    NC County Can't Join AG's Suit Over HCA Healthcare Lapses

    A county in western North Carolina can't intervene in the attorney general's lawsuit accusing a for-profit health network of reneging on promises it made when it bought an Asheville hospital, the state Business Court has said, finding the county's interference would only delay the case.

  • July 10, 2024

    Wash. Condo Assoc. Wants Allstate To Cover $9.7M In Repairs

    A Washington condominium association is suing Allstate Insurance Co. in federal court, saying it broke their coverage agreement by refusing to cover $9.7 million in repairs for "hidden damage" to the buildings' exteriors.

  • July 09, 2024

    CFPB's Latest Rules Agenda Includes Blast From Fed Past

    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau may try to resurrect part of a defunct Federal Reserve regulation that banned banks from employing some consumer credit contract terms, according to a new rulemaking agenda from the agency that also hints at a plan B for its $8 credit card late-fee rule.

  • July 09, 2024

    Nirvana, Marc Jacobs Reach Deal In Smiley Face Logo Fight

    The rock band Nirvana, the fashion brand Marc Jacobs International LLC and a former record company employee have reached a settlement resolving a yearslong dispute over Nirvana's "smiley face" logo, according to a joint report filed in California federal court Tuesday.

  • July 09, 2024

    Bard Fights 'Patent Misuse' Ruling In $53M Suit At 9th Circ.

    Bard urged the Ninth Circuit on Tuesday to reverse a lower court's finding that its attempt to collect $53 million in licensing payments from a medical-device company was a clear case of "patent misuse," arguing that the parties' licensing agreement allows for Bard to collect payments even after the patents-in-suit expired.

  • July 09, 2024

    Fla. Judge Won't Nix Antitrust Claims Against Alcon

    The Florida federal judge presiding over the multidistrict litigation alleging disposable contact lens sellers conspired to fix prices refused Tuesday to let Alcon escape antitrust claims by an online contact lens reseller and sent the suit back to New York.

Expert Analysis

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Shows Lies Must Go To Nature Of Bargain

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Milheiser decision, vacating six mail fraud convictions, clarifies that the key question in federal fraud cases is not whether lies were told, but what they were told about — thus requiring defense counsel to rethink their strategies, say Charles Kreindler and Krista Landis at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Adopting 7 Principles May Improve Voluntary Carbon Markets

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    The Biden administration's recently issued joint policy statement on improving the integrity of voluntary carbon markets may help companies using carbon credits to offset their emissions withstand scrutiny by government agencies, the public and investors, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Managing Legal Risks After University Gaza Protests

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    Following the protests sparked by the war in Gaza, colleges and universities should expect a long investigative tail and take steps to mitigate risks associated with compliance issues under various legal frameworks and institutional policies, say Wiley's Diana Shaw and Colin Cloherty.

  • Debate Over CFPB Definition Of Credit Is Just Beginning

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    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has recently worked to expand the meaning of credit, so anyone operating on the edges of the credit markets, or even those who assumed they were safely outside the scope of this regulatory perimeter, should pay close attention as legal challenges to broad interpretations of the definition unfold, says John Coleman at Orrick.

  • Abu Dhabi Ruling Hints At More Arbitration-Friendly Approach

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    The international and comparative rationale an Abu Dhabi onshore court used to decide that an arbitration agreement referencing a defunct arbitration center was still enforceable suggests that the UAE judiciary may be adopting a more flexible, pro-arbitration framework and stabilizing Dubai's arbitration landscape, say attorneys at Reed Smith.

  • Series

    Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

  • To Make Your Legal Writing Clear, Emulate A Master Chef

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    To deliver clear and effective written advocacy, lawyers should follow the model of a fine dining chef — seasoning a foundation of pure facts with punchy descriptors, spicing it up with analogies, refining the recipe and trimming the fat — thus catering to a sophisticated audience of decision-makers, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Circuit Judge Writes An Opinion, AI Helps: What Now?

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    Last week's Eleventh Circuit opinion in Snell v. United Specialty Insurance, notable for a concurrence outlining the use of artificial intelligence to evaluate a term's common meaning, is hopefully the first step toward developing a coherent basis for the judiciary's generative AI use, says David Zaslowsky at Baker McKenzie.

  • DC Circ. Ruling Heightens HHS Contract Pharmacy Challenges

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    The D.C. Circuit's recent ruling that the Section 340B program does not bar manufacturers from restricting deliveries of discounted drugs to contract pharmacies represents a second strike against the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' current contract pharmacy policy and raises the stakes surrounding an upcoming Seventh Circuit ruling on the same issue, say attorneys at Foley Hoag.

  • Trending At The PTAB: Real Party In Interest And IPR

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    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board’s recent Luminex v. Signify decision, finding a complaint seeking indemnification may be treated as a public demand sufficient to establish a real party-in-interest, shows that the board continues to apply a broad and expansive definition to that term, say Yicong (Eve) Du and Yieyie Yang at Finnegan.

  • How Employers, Attorneys Can Respond To Noncompete Ban

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    As the Federal Trade Commission's recently issued noncompete ban faces ongoing legal challenges, now is a good time for employers to consider whether they want to take a wait-and-see approach before halting use of noncompetes and for practitioners to gain insight into other tools available to protect their clients' business interests, says Jennifer Platzkere Snyder at Dilworth Paxson.

  • Perspectives

    Trauma-Informed Legal Approaches For Pro Bono Attorneys

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    As National Trauma Awareness Month ends, pro bono attorneys should nevertheless continue to acknowledge the mental and physical effects of trauma, allowing them to better represent clients, and protect themselves from compassion fatigue and burnout, say Katherine Cronin at Stinson and Katharine Manning at Blackbird.

  • CFPB's Expanding Scope Evident In Coding Bootcamp Fine

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    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's recent penalty against a for-profit coding bootcamp that misrepresented its tuition financing plans is a sign that the bureau is seeking to wield its supervisory and enforcement powers in more industries that offer consumer financing, say Jason McElroy and Brandon Sherman at Saul Ewing.

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