Connecticut

  • July 10, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Rethink Arbitration Denial In ERISA Suit

    The Second Circuit declined to reconsider its May ruling that a group of financial services companies can't compel individual arbitration of a proposed class action accusing them of overcharging an employee stock ownership plan, rejecting one company's argument that the panel unfairly displayed "hostility to arbitration."

  • July 10, 2024

    Conn. Justices Told Banking Agency's Probe Overstepped

    The Connecticut Department of Banking's investigation into Commonwealth Law Group and Commonwealth Servicing Group LLC's debt negotiation practices violated the constitutional separation of powers, because only the state's judicial branch has regulatory authority over legal services provided to clients by their attorneys, the firms told the state Supreme Court.

  • July 09, 2024

    No Proof Consumers Vexed By 'Spring' Water, Court Told

    Nestle Waters North America Inc. on Tuesday urged a Connecticut federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit alleging that Poland Spring water does not emanate from an actual spring, arguing that references to spring water on product labels mean different things to different consumers and that no confusion has been proved.

  • July 09, 2024

    Indicted Ex-Conn. Official Drops Greece Vacation Plan

    Ex-Connecticut budget official Konstantinos "Kosta" Diamantis on Tuesday dropped his request for a federal judge's permission to travel to Greece while he is under indictment, withdrawing his motion one day after prosecutors objected.

  • July 09, 2024

    Purdue Plans 'High-Speed' Bid For New Ch. 11 Plan

    Purdue Pharma told a New York bankruptcy judge Tuesday that it plans a two-month "high-speed, high-stakes" attempt to replace the Chapter 11 plan shot down by the U.S. Supreme Court last month before unleashing litigation on its former owning family.

  • July 09, 2024

    2nd Circ. Urged To Toss Cannabis Dormant Commerce Suit

    New York cannabis regulators have urged the Second Circuit to disregard a California lawyer's efforts to upend the state's licensing program, arguing that the dormant commerce clause doesn't apply to marijuana, a substance that Congress has not permitted to be traded between states.

  • July 09, 2024

    Baby Bottle Makers Sued Over Claims Products Are 'BPA Free'

    Philips North America and baby product maker Mayborn USA sell baby bottles that contain "considerable amounts of harmful microplastics" despite being advertised as free of the potentially harmful plastic chemical BPA, according to a pair of suits filed in Massachusetts and Connecticut federal courts.

  • July 09, 2024

    Ex-DOJ Atty Tells Guo Jury Of Illicit Extradition Campaign

    Prominent Chinese Communist Party critic Miles Guo capped off his defense to $1 billion fraud charges Tuesday with testimony from a former U.S. Department of Justice attorney, who admitted to participating in a plot to lobby the U.S. government for Guo's extradition to China.

  • July 09, 2024

    Connecticut's Brownstone Park Fights $9M Foot Injury Award

    A Connecticut state jury's $9 million award to a man who suffered a foot injury at an outdoor adventure park is far too high, considering that his medical bills were significantly lower than that and he never missed work, defense counsel argued Tuesday in seeking a new trial or a reduced verdict.

  • July 09, 2024

    Kirkland Guides Avesi Partners To $1.35B Fund II Close

    Stamford, Connecticut-based Avesi Partners, a private equity firm specializing in healthcare and business services, said Tuesday it had closed Avesi Partners Fund II LP at $1.35 billion, with Kirkland & Ellis LLP serving as legal counsel to the oversubscribed fund. 

  • July 08, 2024

    Shopify Privacy Ruling Threatens AGs' Work, 9th Circ. Told

    Attorneys general from 30 states and the District of Columbia, along with a trio of California city attorneys, are calling on the Ninth Circuit to revive a proposed class action accusing payment processing company Shopify of collecting shoppers' sensitive information without permission, arguing that the dispute threatens to deprive them of their ability to enforce their states' consumer protection laws. 

  • July 08, 2024

    2nd Circ. Lets Rail Co. Retool Suit Against Big Banks

    The Second Circuit on Monday restored Eddystone Rail Co. LLC's lawsuit targeting Bank of America NA and other banks for their alleged roles helping an oil transportation and logistics company evade liability in a roughly $140 million contract dispute, reasoning that the rail company still has time to amend its complaint.

  • July 08, 2024

    Purdue Creditors Look To Sue Sacklers After Justices' Ruling

    The official committee of unsecured creditors in the Chapter 11 case of drugmaker Purdue Pharma asked a New York bankruptcy judge on Monday for standing to bring actions against members of the Sackler family that own the company after the U.S. Supreme Court torpedoed a precarious settlement among the parties.

  • July 08, 2024

    Full 2nd Circ. Urged To 'Correct' Panel's Insider Trading Ruling

    A hedge fund accused of taking advantage of its corporate insider status to profit off swing trading in 1-800-Flowers' stock is urging the full bench of the Second Circuit to reconsider a decision to revive the lawsuit against it, arguing in a Monday petition to the court that the ruling clashes with both U.S. Supreme Court precedent and with controlling Second Circuit precedent on standing. 

  • July 08, 2024

    Conn. Asset Manager Offers Grayscale $2M Out For Ad Suit

    A Fairfield, Connecticut-based asset management firm that accused Grayscale Investments LLC of falsely advertising its services in order to lure investors informed the company and the Constitution State court hearing its lawsuit that it would be willing to settle the matter for a just below $2 million payment.

  • July 08, 2024

    Anesthesia Death Trial Ends In $15.4M Award For Estate

    A Connecticut anesthesiology group must pay $15.4 million to the estate of a 57-year-old woman who suffered cardiorespiratory collapse and severe brain damage during a routine 20-minute outpatient gastroenterology imaging procedure and died a month later in an intensive care unit, a state superior court jury has decided.

  • July 08, 2024

    HR Chief Says Conn. City Cut Pay Without Explanation

    Officials in the city of Derby, Connecticut, flouted the municipal human resources director's contractual and constitutional rights when they reduced her annual compensation in March without explanation, according to a lawsuit in federal court.

  • July 08, 2024

    Yale Hospital Earmarks $411M For Possible Judgment

    Yale New Haven Health Services Corp. has agreed to set aside $411.5 million to satisfy a potential judgment against it in an ongoing dispute over its soured $435 million deal to buy three Connecticut facilities run by Prospect Medical Holdings Inc., according to a stipulation from the parties.

  • July 05, 2024

    Conn. Firm Sued For Repping Both Parties In Business Sale

    A Connecticut law firm has been hit with a malpractice suit saying an attorney improperly represented both parties in the sale of an interest in a restaurant business and ultimately drafted an agreement that misstated the deal in favor of the seller, leading to a $750,000 claim against the buyer.

  • July 05, 2024

    Real Estate Recap: Post-Chevron, Lawyer Leaps, Q&A Recap

    Catch up on this past week's key developments by state from Law360 Real Estate Authority — including policy areas to watch in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's paradigm-shifting Chevron ruling, recent real estate lawyer moves and some insightful conversations with real estate lawyers you may have missed.

  • July 05, 2024

    Fired Atty Only Gets $9K From $1.5M Motorcycle Crash Deal

    A Connecticut appeals court ruled Friday that $9,000 was a fair payment to a personal injury attorney who was fired after he quickly obtained a $100,000 settlement offer for a motorcyclist who eventually settled for $1.5 million.

  • July 05, 2024

    How Reshaped Circuit Courts Are Faring At The High Court

    Seminal rulings from the U.S. Supreme Court's latest term will reshape many facets of American society in the coming years. Already, however, the rulings offer glimpses of how the justices view specific circuit courts, which have themselves been reshaped by an abundance of new judges.

  • July 05, 2024

    Breaking Down The Vote: The High Court Term In Review

    The U.S. Supreme Court's lethargic pace of decision-making this term left the justices to issue a slew of highly anticipated and controversial rulings during the term's final week — rulings that put the court's ideological divisions on vivid display. Here, Law360 takes a data dive into the numbers behind this court term.

  • July 05, 2024

    High Court Flexes Muscle To Limit Administrative State

    The U.S. Supreme Court's dismantling of a 40-year-old judicial deference doctrine, coupled with rulings stripping federal agencies of certain enforcement powers and exposing them to additional litigation, has established the October 2023 term as likely the most consequential in administrative law history.

  • July 05, 2024

    The Sharpest Dissents From The Supreme Court Term

    The U.S. Supreme Court's session ended with a series of blockbuster cases that granted the president broad immunity, changed federal gun policy and kneecapped administrative agencies. And many of the biggest decisions fell along partisan lines.

Expert Analysis

  • Fair Use Doctrine Faces Challenges In The Generative AI Era

    Author Photo

    As courts struggle to apply existing copyright principles to new, digital contexts, the evolving capabilities of AI technologies are testing the limits of traditional frameworks, with the fair use doctrine being met with significant challenges, says John Poulos at Norton Rose.

  • Lower Courts May Finally Be Getting The Memo After Ciminelli

    Author Photo

    A year after the U.S. Supreme Court again limited prosecutors' overbroad theories of fraud in Ciminelli v. U.S., early returns suggest that the message has at least partially landed with the lower courts, spotlighting lessons for defense counsel moving forward, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • After A Brief Hiccup, The 'Rocket Docket' Soars Back To No. 1

    Author Photo

    The Eastern District of Virginia’s precipitous 2022 fall from its storied rocket docket status appears to have been a temporary aberration, as recent statistics reveal that the court is once again back on top as the fastest federal civil trial court in the nation, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

  • Recruitment Trends In Emerging Law Firm Frontiers

    Author Photo

    BigLaw firms are facing local recruitment challenges as they increasingly establish offices in cities outside of the major legal hubs, requiring them to weigh various strategies for attracting talent that present different risks and benefits, says Tom Hanlon at Buchanan Law.

  • Series

    Glassblowing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    I never expected that glassblowing would strongly influence my work as an attorney, but it has taught me the importance of building a solid foundation for your work, learning from others and committing to a lifetime of practice, says Margaret House at Kalijarvi Chuzi.

  • How Associates Can Build A Professional Image

    Author Photo

    As hybrid work arrangements become the norm in the legal industry, early-career attorneys must be proactive in building and maintaining a professional presence in both physical and digital settings, ensuring that their image aligns with their long-term career goals, say Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners and Estelle Winsett at Estelle Winsett Professional Image Consulting.

  • 5 Steps To Navigating State Laws On Healthcare Transactions

    Author Photo

    As more states pass legislation requiring healthcare-transaction notice, private equity investors and other deal parties should evaluate the new laws and consider ways to mitigate their effects, say Carol Loepere and Nicole Aiken-Shaban at Reed Smith.

  • Firms Must Rethink How They Train New Lawyers In AI Age

    Author Photo

    As law firms begin to use generative artificial intelligence to complete lower-level legal tasks, they’ll need to consider new ways to train summer associates and early-career attorneys, keeping in mind the five stages of skill acquisition, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Always Be Closing

    Author Photo

    When a lawyer presents their case with the right propulsive structure throughout trial, there is little need for further argument after the close of evidence — and in fact, rehashing it all may test jurors’ patience — so attorneys should consider other strategies for closing arguments, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

    Author Photo

    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Politics In The Workplace: What Employers Need To Know

    Author Photo

    As the 2024 election approaches and protests continue across the country, employers should be aware of employees' rights — and limits on those rights — related to political speech and activities in the workplace, and be prepared to act proactively to prevent issues before they arise, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

    Author Photo

    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Shows Lies Must Go To Nature Of Bargain

    Author Photo

    The Ninth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Milheiser decision, vacating six mail fraud convictions, clarifies that the key question in federal fraud cases is not whether lies were told, but what they were told about — thus requiring defense counsel to rethink their strategies, say Charles Kreindler and Krista Landis at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Live Nation May Shake It Off In A Long Game With The DOJ

    Author Photo

    Don't expect a swift resolution in the U.S. Department of Justice's case against Live Nation, but a long litigation, with the company likely to represent itself as the creator of a competitive ecosystem, and the government faced with explaining how the ticketing giant formed under its watch, say Thomas Kliebhan and Taylor Hixon at GRSM50.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Connecticut archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!