Corporate Crime & Compliance UK

  • June 17, 2024

    Feds Take Hard Line On Tycoon's Pilots After He Goes Free

    Manhattan federal prosecutors asked a sentencing judge to consider aggravating circumstances for two pilots who allegedly traded on stock tips from U.K. billionaire Joe Lewis, despite not seeking a prison term for the private equity honcho and former soccer club owner.

  • June 17, 2024

    Next Gov't Urged To Install Criminal Justice Reforms

    A criminal justice advocacy group on Monday said the next British government should be transparent and honest about its ability to fix the country's criminal justice system and proposed measures to address overcrowded prisons and a backlog in Crown Court cases.

  • June 17, 2024

    Judge Axes Ex-Stobart CEO's Conspiracy Claim

    Allowing Stobart Group's former chief executive to reargue that he was the victim of a conspiracy to remove him as chair would be "an abuse of process," a London court ruled Monday as it struck out his claim against the company and five of its directors.

  • June 17, 2024

    SFO Intends To Charge Individuals In Glencore Bribery Case

    The Serious Fraud Office is seeking permission to charge individuals in its bribery probe into international commodities trader and miner Glencore, the crime-fighting agency confirmed at a London court on Monday.

  • June 17, 2024

    StanChart Investors Can 'Piggyback' On US Sanctions Claims

    Standard Chartered PLC lost its bid at a London appellate court on Monday to toss accusations by investors that the bank downplayed by hundreds of billions of dollars the extent to which it had breached U.S. sanctions against Iran.

  • June 17, 2024

    Political Parties Urged To Accelerate Financial Inclusion

    An independent body of parliamentarians and finance experts called on Monday on the main political parties to establish a national strategy on financial inclusion in the first 100 days of a new government.

  • June 17, 2024

    UBS Sets $900M Aside For Greensill-Linked Redemptions

    UBS said on Monday that it expects to record a $900 million liability to pay back inherited Credit Suisse clients the money they lost in funds linked to Greensill Capital, the supply-chain finance company that collapsed in 2021.

  • June 14, 2024

    Meta Halts AI Tech Debut In EU After Regulatory Backlash

    Meta Platforms Inc. said Friday that it was putting on hold plans to expand its artificial intelligence offerings to the European market after the Irish privacy regulator raised concerns about the company's efforts to use public content posted on Facebook and Instagram to fuel these models.

  • June 14, 2024

    Tesco Car Crash Scammer Found In Contempt

    A scammer who made a false compensation claim against Tesco over a staged traffic accident was on Friday found in contempt of court for having another man impersonate him in a hearing and trying to blame his lawyers for the fraudulent claim.

  • June 14, 2024

    Swiss Re, Chubb Deny Liability In £13B Stranded Planes Feud

    Swiss Re and Chubb have denied that they are liable for aircraft detained in Russia after it invaded Ukraine amid a slew of claims totaling £13 billion ($16.5 billion), telling a London court that their insurance policies do not cover the fallout of war.

  • June 14, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen toy company Jellycat hit supermarket Aldi with an intellectual property claim, AIG start proceedings against firefighting foam company Angus International Safety Group, and the Solicitors Regulation Authority file a legal claim against the Post Office amid the ongoing Horizon IT scandal. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • June 14, 2024

    Labour Eyes Flexible Financial Regulation To Spur Growth

    The Labour Party prioritized financial services growth this week as it eyes Downing Street, suggesting a new era of more flexible regulation to drive technological innovation and competitiveness, regulatory lawyers say.

  • June 14, 2024

    UK Broker Denied Supreme Court Hearing Over Cum Ex Raids

    Judges at a London court refused on Friday to allow a brokerage to challenge at the U.K. Supreme Court findings that a raid on its London office during an investigation into tax fraud in 2022 was legal, finding that the "outcome of any appeal would be no different."

  • June 14, 2024

    UK Sanctions Russian Insurer In Move Against 'Shadow Fleet'

    Britain has said it has blacklisted Moscow insurance giant Ingosstrakh in a move to curb the growth of a "shadow fleet" of vessels carrying Russian oil at a price above an internationally agreed cap.

  • June 14, 2024

    Bitcoin 'Inventor' Drops Case Against Software Developers

    Lawyers for the man who failed to prove he invented bitcoin told a London court on Friday that he has dropped a case brought by his company against software developers as it also turned on his claim to be the pseudonymous inventor of the virtual currency.

  • June 13, 2024

    EU Makes First Ever Formal Pharma Price-Fixing Complaint

    European Union antitrust authorities issued their first ever price-fixing complaint in the pharmaceutical industry Thursday, going after the only company that did not agree to a €13.4 million ($14.4 million) settlement in October.

  • June 13, 2024

    Meta Facing Complaint Over Plans To Train AI With User Data

    A Norwegian consumer protection group has hit Meta with a legal challenge over its plans to deploy its users' data — including images and posts — to train artificial intelligence models.

  • June 13, 2024

    How 3 Firms Cleared 2 Ex-Autonomy Execs In HP Fraud Case

    A California federal jury's rejection last week of fraud charges against the founder and former finance vice president of British software company Autonomy validated an approach by the defendants' three law firms — Steptoe, Clifford Chance and Bird Marella — to form a "seamless" collaboration throughout the trial, from jury selection to closing arguments.

  • June 13, 2024

    Angolan Billionaire Dos Santos Fights £580M Asset Freeze

    The daughter of Angola's former president argued at the Court of Appeal Thursday that the wrong legal test had been applied when telecoms operator Unitel SA secured a £580 million ($740 million) freezing order against her assets.

  • June 13, 2024

    Labour To Set Up Watchdog For COVID Corruption

    The Labour Party promised to create a new COVID-19 corruption tsar and use "every means possible" to recoup public money lost in fraud and failed contracts during the pandemic, as it launched its general election manifesto Thursday.

  • June 13, 2024

    UK Digital Markets Law Will Spur Group Consumer Litigation

    Hastily passed legislation that equipped the competition regulator with the clout to punish companies for breaches of consumer protection will probably spur litigation, lawyers say, although claims will be limited for now after the proposal to extend the class action scheme was abandoned.

  • June 13, 2024

    UK Adds 42 Entries To Russian Financial Sanctions List

    The U.K. government slapped further sanctions on Thursday on 42 individuals and entities involved in sectors of strategic significance to the Russian government, including financial services and defense, as it continues to respond to the unprovoked war waged by Russia against Ukraine.

  • June 13, 2024

    Lawyer Struck Off For Fake Immigration Application Claims

    A solicitor who was imprisoned for helping clients make bogus immigration applications to remain in the U.K. was struck off by a tribunal Thursday.

  • June 13, 2024

    Media Personalities Appear At Court Charged Over Forex Ads

    Six reality TV stars and social media influencers appeared at a London court for the first time Thursday charged with promoting an unauthorized trading scheme online that dealt with high-risk financial products tied to foreign exchange rates.

  • June 13, 2024

    Labour Prioritizes Wealth Creation In Election Manifesto

    Keir Starmer said on Thursday that his Labour Party would kick-start a future of "national renewal" if it wins the general election, with economic growth and wealth creation driving a manifesto that lacked any surprise headline pledges.

Expert Analysis

  • A Look At Environment Agency's New Economic Crime Unit

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    Sophie Wood at Kingsley Napley explains how the Environment Agency’s newly established Economic Crime Unit will pursue criminal money flows from environmental offenses, and discusses the unit’s civil powers, including the ability to administer account freezing and forfeiture orders, says Sophie Wood at Kingsley Napley.

  • Prompt Engineering Skills Are Changing The Legal Profession

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    With a focus on higher-value work as repetitive tasks are delegated to artificial intelligence, legal roles are set to become more inspiring, and lawyers need not fear the rising demand for prompt engineers that is altering the technology-enabled legal environment, say Eric Crawley, Shah Karim and Paul O’Hagan at Epiq Legal.

  • Opinion

    UK Whistleblowers Flock To The US For Good Reason

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    The U.K. Serious Fraud Office director recently brought renewed attention to the differences between the U.K. and U.S. whistleblower regimes — differences that may make reporting to U.S. agencies a better and safer option for U.K. whistleblowers, and show why U.K. whistleblower laws need to be improved, say Benjamin Calitri and Kate Reeves at Kohn Kohn.

  • 4 Ways To Prepare For EU's Digital Finance Security Law

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    Companies that will fall under the scope of the Digital Operational Resilience Act when it goes into effect next January should take several proactive steps as they prepare for new corporate governance, risk management, incident reporting and third-party contracting obligations, says Edward Machin at Ropes & Gray.

  • 4 Legal Privilege Lessons From Dechert Disclosure Ruling

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    The Court of Appeal's recent decision in Al Sadeq v. Dechert LLP, finding that evidence may have been incorrectly withheld, provides welcome clarification of the scope of legal professional privilege, including the application of the iniquity exception, says Tim Knight at Travers Smith.

  • BT Case May Shape UK Class Action Landscape

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    The first opt-out collective action trial commenced in Le Patourel v. BT in the U.K. Competition Appeal Tribunal last month, regarding BT's abuse of dominance by overcharging millions of customers, will likely provide clarification on damages and funder returns in collective actions, which could significantly affect the class action regime, say lawyers at RPC.

  • No-Poach Agreements Face Greater EU Antitrust Scrutiny

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    EU competition authorities are increasingly viewing employer no-poach agreements as anti-competitive and an enforcement priority, demonstrating that such provisions are no longer without risk in Europe, and proving the importance of understanding EU antitrust law concerns and implications, says Robert Hardy at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Key Points From EC Economic Security Screening Initiatives

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    Lawyers at Herbert Smith analyze the European Commission's five recently announced initiatives aimed at de-risking the EU's trade and investment links with third countries, including the implementation of mandatory screening mechanisms and extending coverage to investments made by EU companies that are controlled subsidiaries of non-EU investors.

  • Following The Road Map Toward Quantum Security

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    With the Financial Conduct Authority’s recent publication of a white paper on a quantum-secure financial sector, firms should begin to consider the quantum transition early — before the process is driven by regulatory obligations — with the goal of developing a cybersecurity architecture that is agile while also allowing for quantum security, say lawyers at Cleary.

  • Why EU Ruling On Beneficial Ownership May Affect The UK

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    Following the EU judgment in Sovim v. Luxembourg that public access to beneficial ownership information conflicts with data protection rights, several British overseas territories and dependencies have recently reversed their commitment to introduce unrestricted access, and challenges to the U.K.’s liberal stance may be on the cards, says Rupert Cullen at Allectus Law.

  • UK Gov't Response Clarifies AI Regulation Approach

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    Although the U.K. government’s recent response to its artificial intelligence consultation is a clear signal of its continuing pro-innovation approach to AI regulation, high-level systems are likely to be the focus of scrutiny and organizations may consider reviewing measures they have implemented to help identify risks, say Christopher Foo and Edward Machin at Ropes & Gray.

  • Key Changes In FRC Code Aim To Promote Good Governance

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    The focus of the recently published Financial Reporting Council Corporate Governance Code on risk management and internal controls is to ensure the competitiveness of the U.K. listing regime while not compromising on governance standards, and issuers may wish to consider updating their policies in order to follow best practice, say lawyers at Debevoise.

  • Ruling In FCA Case Offers Tips On Flexible Work Requests

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    In Wilson v. Financial Conduct Authority, the Employment Tribunal recently found that the regulator's rejection of a remote work request was justified, highlighting for employers factors that affect flexible work request outcomes, while emphasizing that individual inquiries should be considered on the specific facts, say Frances Rollin, Ella Tunnell and Kerry Garcia at Stevens & Bolton.

  • EU Vote Delay Puts Course Of Sustainability Directive In Doubt

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    With time to adopt the proposed EU Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence Directive during this Parliamentary term running out, and with upcoming elections threatening political uncertainty, the degree of compromise that may be needed to secure a "yes" vote now could undermine the shift the legislation seeks to achieve, say lawyers at Simpson Thacher.

  • Full EU Import Border Controls Pose Hurdles For UK Cos.

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    The U.K.’s long-anticipated introduction of full border controls on imports of goods from the EU, due to complete by the end of 2024, brings the system broadly into line with goods imported from the rest of the world, but may result in delays, increased costs and disruption as businesses adapt, say Ben Chivers and Jonathan Rush at Travers Smith.

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