Wage & Hour

  • June 18, 2024

    Ex-Twitter Workers Seek Class Cert. In Arbitration Fee Fight

    A group of former Twitter workers who accuse X Corp. of stalling their employment disputes by refusing to pay arbitration fees urged a California federal judge Monday to certify multiple classes of workers over allegations their arbitration efforts have been thwarted by the social media giant.

  • June 18, 2024

    Meat Plant Workers Seek OK On Latest $4M Wage-Fix Deal

    Red meat processing plant workers have sought preliminary approval for their latest settlement over wage-fixing claims, a $4 million deal that adds American Foods Group LLC to the list of companies to cut deals that also includes JBS, Tyson, Perdue, Seaboard, Triumph and consulting firm Webber Meng Sahl & Co.

  • June 18, 2024

    7th Circ. Brings Back Cruise Worker's OT Suit

    The Seventh Circuit revived a proposed collective action Tuesday accusing a steamboat cruise company of depriving workers of overtime wages, finding Indiana arbitration law states that the pact the worker and company signed is governed by, and is invalid under, the Federal Arbitration Act.

  • June 18, 2024

    2nd Pa. Jury Can't Agree On Uber Black Drivers' Status

    A second Pennsylvania federal jury was unable to determine whether Uber Black drivers are the company's employees or independent contractors, telling the trial judge on Tuesday that the eight members were hopelessly deadlocked.

  • June 18, 2024

    Ogletree Adds Quarles & Brady Litigator In San Diego

    Labor and employment firm Ogletree Deakins Nash Smoak & Stewart PC has hired from Quarles & Brady LLP a new shareholder for its San Diego office who has more than a decade of experience.

  • June 18, 2024

    Bakery Wants To Stop Quick Appeal Of Arbitration Order

    A bakery urged a Connecticut federal judge to deny two food distributors' bid for a quick appeal of an order directing them to arbitrate their independent contractor misclassification claims, saying the request "falls woefully short" of the standards for an appeal.

  • June 18, 2024

    Liberty University Settles Time Sheet Suit

    Liberty University will pay $30,000 to end a proposed collective action alleging that its supervisors of intramural sports employees tampered with workers' time records to cap their schedules at 40 hours per week to avoid paying them overtime, according to court papers filed Tuesday.

  • June 18, 2024

    Mayer Brown Adds Litigation Vet As Employment Co-Chair

    Mayer Brown LLP said Tuesday it added an employment litigation veteran with nearly two decades of experience to co-lead the firm's employment litigation and counseling practice.

  • June 18, 2024

    High Court May Help Employers Claiming Overtime Exemption

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision this week to review evidentiary standards in wage and hour cases is likely to result in a ruling amplifying the justices' 2018 precedent that statutory exemptions from overtime should be construed fairly, rather than narrowly

  • June 18, 2024

    NJ Steakhouse Pays $90K For Stiffing Workers On Wages

    A New Jersey steakhouse paid nearly $90,000 in back wages, damages and fines for denying 13 workers their overtime wages, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Tuesday.

  • June 18, 2024

    Workers Score Default Win In Trucking Co. Wage Suit

    A now-defunct trucking company must pay about $93,000 to end a suit alleging it didn't pay two workers minimum and overtime wages, a California federal judge ordered, after granting the workers' bid for default judgment last year.

  • June 18, 2024

    Va. City Can't Ax Atty's Wrongful Firing Suit Over FMLA Fraud

    A federal judge declined to toss an attorney's suit claiming the Virginia city he worked for illegally fired him and accused him of doctoring a medical form he needed to care for his sick mother, saying he showed the city may have stepped on his medical leave rights.

  • June 18, 2024

    Treasury Finalizes Labor Rules For Bonus Energy Tax Credits

    The U.S. Treasury Department released final labor rules Tuesday for clean energy projects seeking to significantly boost the value of their tax credits, emphasizing due diligence by developers and announcing that more IRS resources will go toward enforcement of the rules.

  • June 17, 2024

    Third Pa. Uber Trial Unlikely As Deadlock Again Looms

    With a second deadlocked jury appearing imminent in the Philadelphia UberBlack employment classification trial, a Pennsylvania federal judge on Monday told attorneys he was skeptical a third trial is on the way to resolve the case.

  • June 17, 2024

    9th Circ. Tosses Cleaner's Appeal In Misclassification Row

    The Ninth Circuit ruled Monday that it lacks jurisdiction over a worker's challenge of a district court's decision refusing to reopen his suit claiming a janitorial franchising company misclassified workers as independent contractors.

  • June 17, 2024

    Shell, HF Sinclair Settle USW's Meme Poster Back Pay Dispute

    Shell Oil and HF Sinclair have settled a dispute over which company is responsible for back pay to a worker who was fired after posting a meme that was found not to be grounds for termination, following the United Steelworkers' bid for enforcement of an arbitration award.

  • June 17, 2024

    Amazon Seeks To Trim Reopened Contractor Wage Suit

    Amazon urged a Washington federal judge to toss claims in a long-running, recently reopened lawsuit alleging the company misclassified drivers as independent contractors, saying the workers still had not provided any concrete evidence to support their claims.

  • June 17, 2024

    Property Preservation Co. Settles 15 Misclassification Suits

    A property preservation company told a California federal court it reached a deal to settle 15 suits claiming it owes workers wages after misclassifying them as independent contractors.

  • June 17, 2024

    Don't Let Farm Org Rewrite Wage Rule Suit, DOL Tells Judge

    A farm group shouldn't be allowed to revise its challenge to the U.S. Department of Labor's new wage rule for certain temporary workers, the agency told a Charlotte, North Carolina, federal judge, saying the revision attempt comes too late as the matter is already awaiting the judge's decision.

  • June 17, 2024

    Federal Contractor Wage Bump Gears Up For Supreme Court

    Two outdoor groups urged the Tenth Circuit to press pause on its ruling that President Joe Biden could spike federal contractors' hourly minimum wage, saying they plan to ask for the U.S. Supreme Court's intervention.

  • June 17, 2024

    Delivery Co. Inks $2.9M Deal In Drivers' Misclassification Suit

    A class of package delivery drivers asked a Massachusetts federal judge to sign off on a $2.9 million settlement resolving a lawsuit accusing a delivery company of misclassifying the drivers as independent contractors and illegally docking their pay, saying the average class member will receive $12,000.

  • June 17, 2024

    High Court Will Mull Proof Needed For Wage-Hour Carveout

    The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday it will hear a wage and hour case from a supermarket distributor, teeing up an opportunity for the justices to articulate the standard by which an employer must demonstrate workers are exempt from overtime.

  • June 17, 2024

    Supreme Court Won't Revisit Calif. Law Arbitration Issue

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined on Monday to revisit a case dealing with the arbitration of claims brought under a California law enabling workers to sue on behalf of the state and other workers for labor violations, an issue the justices decided on in 2022.

  • June 17, 2024

    Justices Pass On Revisiting PAGA Arbitration Issue

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined on Monday to take another look at the fate of nonindividual claims under California's Private Attorneys General Act when individual claims go to arbitration in a case involving Uber that was previously before the high court.

  • June 14, 2024

    GOP AGs Demand Stay For DOL's H-2A Protections Rule

    Seventeen Republican attorneys general requested a pause on the effective date for the U.S. Department of Labor's final rule covering foreign farmworkers within the H-2A visa program, telling the court that the rule provides protections that U.S. citizen agricultural workers lack under federal labor law.

Expert Analysis

  • Calif. Whistleblower Decision Signals Change For Employers

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    Because the California Supreme Court's recent The People v. Kolla's decision significantly expands employee whistleblower protections, employers should ensure that internal reporting procedures clearly communicate the appropriate methods of reporting and elevating suspected violations of law, say Alison Tsao and Sophia Jimenez at CDF Labor Law.

  • Pay Transparency And ESG Synergy Can Inform Initiatives

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    The proliferation of pay transparency laws and ESG initiatives has created unique opportunities for companies to comply with the challenging laws while furthering their social aims, says Kelly Cardin at Ogletree.

  • Eye On Compliance: An NLRB Primer For Private Employers

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    Many employers, especially those with nonunionized workforces, may not realize they are subject to federal labor law, but with a recent flurry of precedent-changing rulings from the National Labor Relations, understanding how to comply with the National Labor Relations Act may now be more important than ever, says Bruno Katz at Wilson Elser.

  • RETRACTED: How New Prevailing Wage Rule May Affect H-1B Employment

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    Editor's note: This guest article has been removed due to an inaccurate discussion of the status of the U.S. Department of Labor's prevailing wage rule, "Strengthening Wage Protections for the Temporary and Permanent Employment of Certain Aliens in the United States." The rule is no longer on the Biden administration's current rulemaking agenda.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Office Drug Abuse Insights From 'Industry'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with Squarespace general counsel Larissa Boz about how employees in the Max TV show "Industry" abuse drugs and alcohol to cope with their high-pressure jobs, and discuss managerial and drug testing best practices for addressing suspected substance use at work.

  • How New Pregnancy, Nursing Laws Surpass Prior Protections

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    Employers must understand how the new Pregnant Workers Fairness and PUMP Acts build on existing federal workplace laws — and they will need to make key updates to ensure compliance, say Alexandra Garrison Barnett and Leigh Shapiro at Alston & Bird, and Kandis Wood Jackson at McKinsey & Co.

  • 6th Circ. FLSA Class Opt-In Ruling Levels Field For Employers

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    By rejecting the established approach for determining whether other employees are similarly situated to the original plaintiffs in a Fair Labor Standards Act suit, the Sixth Circuit in Clark v. A&L Homecare reshaped the balance of power in favor of employer-defendants in FLSA collective actions, say Melissa Kelly and Gregory Abrams at Tucker Ellis.

  • FMLA Confusion Persists Despite New DOL Advisory

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    A recent U.S. Department of Labor advisory opinion provides some clarity regarding the Family and Medical Leave Act's handling of holiday weeks, but the FMLA remains a legal minefield that demands fact-specific analysis of each employee's unique situation, says Nicholas Schneider at Eckert Seamans.

  • East Penn Verdict Is An FLSA Cautionary Tale For Employers

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    A Pennsylvania federal jury's recent $22 million verdict against East Penn set a record for the Fair Labor Standards Act and should serve as a reminder to employers that failure to keep complete wage and hour records can exponentially increase liability exposure under the FLSA, say Benjamin Hinks and Danielle Lederman at Bowditch & Dewey.

  • Pay Transparency Laws Complicate Foreign Labor Cert.

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    State and local laws adopted to help close the gender pay gap pose challenges for U.S. companies recruiting foreign nationals, as they try to navigate a thicket of pay transparency laws without running afoul of federally regulated recruitment practices, say Stephanie Pimentel and Asha George at Berry Appleman.

  • 2 Ways Calif. Justices' PAGA Ruling May Play Out

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    In Adolph v. Uber, the California Supreme Court will soon decide whether an employee’s representative Private Attorneys General Act claims can stay in court when their individual claims go to arbitration — either exposing employers to battles in multiple forums, or affirming arbitration agreements’ ability to extinguish nonindividual claims, says Justin Peters at Carlton Fields.

  • How To Navigate Class Incentive Awards After Justices' Denial

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    Despite a growing circuit split on the permissibility of incentive awards, the U.S. Supreme Court recently declined to hear cases on the issue, meaning class action defendants must consider whether to agree to incentive awards as part of a classwide settlement and how to best structure the agreement, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Check Onboarding Docs To Protect Arbitration Agreements

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    The California Court of Appeal's recent Alberto v. Cambrian Homecare decision opens a new and unexpected avenue of attack on employment arbitration agreements in California — using other employment-related agreements to render otherwise enforceable arbitration agreements unenforceable, say Morgan Forsey and Ian Michalak at Sheppard Mullin.