Immigration

  • June 12, 2024

    New Border Rules 'Blatantly' Flout US Asylum Law, Suit Says

    Immigrant rights groups sued the Biden administration Wednesday in Washington, D.C., federal court over a new policy that largely halts asylum for migrants crossing the border in between ports of entry, saying the policy echoes unlawful Trump-era asylum bans.

  • June 12, 2024

    Landscaper's H-2B App Doomed By Missing Permanent Staff

    A Utah landscaper's efforts to hire 15 construction workers through the H-2B seasonal worker visa program was doomed by evidence that the company hadn't maintained a permanent workforce, according to a recent U.S. Department of Labor decision.

  • June 12, 2024

    USCIS Eases Security Measures For Naturalized Crime Survivors

    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services announced Wednesday that foreign-born survivors of crime will no longer be subject to heightened confidentiality measures once they obtain U.S. citizenship, in an effort to ease their ability to apply for more immigration benefits.

  • June 12, 2024

    DHS Watchdog Says Agency Must Improve Vetting, Screening

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is unable to effectively and fully screen and vet asylum-seekers with applications that have been pending for a while, along with noncitizens seeking admission to the U.S., the inspector general has found.

  • June 12, 2024

    Feds Urge 5th Circ. Against Fast-Tracking Parole Suit

    The Biden administration rebuked a Texas-led coalition's efforts to fast-track its challenge to an immigration program for Cubans, Haitians, Nicaraguans and Venezuelans, telling the Fifth Circuit the states won't suffer financial injury from the program while the case is underway.

  • June 12, 2024

    Construction Co. Owes $353K For H-2A Violations, DOL Says

    A Nebraska construction company operating in California must pay nearly $353,000 in back wages and fines for denying 43 workers their full wages and rights under the H-2A temporary worker program, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Wednesday.

  • June 11, 2024

    DOL's H-2A Protections Rule Flouts Labor Law, GOP AGs Say

    The U.S. Department of Labor's final rule including protections for foreign farmworkers within the H-2A visa program doesn't comport with federal labor law, a group of Republican attorneys general claimed in Georgia federal court, saying the rule doesn't give the same rights to U.S. citizen workers.

  • June 11, 2024

    Ore. Horse Stable Hasn't Justified Adding 2 H-2B Trainers

    A U.S. Department of Labor judge rejected an Oregon stable's efforts to hire two horse trainers through the H-2B guest worker visa program, saying the stable hadn't shown why it specifically needed two extra workers.

  • June 11, 2024

    4th Circ. Unconvinced Migrant Siblings' Abuse Was Retaliatory

    The Fourth Circuit has refused to revive an asylum application from two Salvadoran siblings fleeing an abusive uncle, unconvinced that the uncle had targeted the pair in retaliation for their mother's reporting him to the police.

  • June 11, 2024

    NC Hair Braiding Biz Loses H-2B Bid Over Year-Round Need

    A North Carolina hair braiding business won't be able to hire three shampoo assistants after a U.S. Department of Labor appeals board found that an increase in business doesn't qualify as temporary need under the H-2B temporary foreign labor program.

  • June 11, 2024

    NY Courts Agree To Boost Translation Services After Bias Case

    New York state court officials instituted reforms and sealed an agreement with federal prosecutors on Tuesday related to claims that an upstate county denied Spanish-speaking defendants translation services in violation of their civil rights.

  • June 11, 2024

    Immigration Firm Says Rival Poached Workers And Stole TM

    A Washington immigration law firm specializing in visas for domestic violence and sex trafficking victims is accusing a competing Texas firm of poaching its employees and stealing a Spanish phrase covered by its trademark — "Arreglar sin salir!" — which translates to "fix without leaving."

  • June 10, 2024

    Permanent Residents Say Iowa Removal Law Will Ensnare Them

    Immigrant advocacy group Iowa Migrant Movement for Justice responded on Monday in Iowa federal court to the state's argument that lawful permanent residents are exempted from a law empowering officials to arrest and remove previously deported noncitizens, saying no such exception exists.

  • June 10, 2024

    Labor Shortage Can't Justify Bid For H-2B Caregivers

    A U.S. Department of Labor judge rejected a home healthcare company's efforts to use an alleged national labor shortage to push through an application to hire foreign workers, saying the company hadn't shown the labor issue was likely to end.

  • June 10, 2024

    Ohio Judge Won't Free Feds From Wife's Visa Delay Suit

    An Ohio federal magistrate judge refused to free the U.S. Department of State from a lawsuit challenging a delayed green card application, rejecting officials' claims that an application pushed into administrative proceedings was outside the court's purview.

  • June 10, 2024

    Migrant Cleaners Rebuff Colo. Hotel's Bid To Ditch Wage Suit

    The migrant contractor staff that cleaned a Colorado luxury hotel slammed the hotel's efforts to escape claims of underpaying its workers, telling a Colorado federal court Monday that the hotel set the terms of their employment.

  • June 10, 2024

    Texas Urges 5th Circ. To Prioritize DHS Parole Program Appeal

    Texas has urged the Fifth Circuit to expedite its bid to revive a challenge to the Biden administration's parole program for Cuba, Haiti, Nicaragua and Venezuela, saying time is of the essence because the case has major implications on federal immigration policy.

  • June 07, 2024

    Fla. Urges Judge To Reconsider Block Of Immigration Law

    Florida has urged a federal judge to reconsider an order blocking a state law that criminalizes the transportation of unauthorized immigrants, saying its argument that opposing parties failed to state the law is federally preempted was never addressed by the court.

  • June 07, 2024

    Judge Doubts Ethnicity Questions Deserve Jury Bias Probe

    A Washington appellate judge pushed back Friday against a Filipino family who claimed a hospital's questions about their ethnicity at trial required a bias inquiry, noting race is "something that can't be ignored" in any courtroom filled with people who look different from one another.

  • June 07, 2024

    DC Circ. Won't Let Gov't Toss Sped-Up Timeline For Ally Visas

    The D.C. Circuit on Friday refused to terminate a plan requiring the U.S. Department of State to speed up visa processing for Iraqi and Afghan nationals, ruling that some judicial involvement is still necessary to address delays.

  • June 07, 2024

    Judge Asks Impact Of New Border Policy On CBP App Suit

    A California federal judge has asked for briefing on the impact of a new executive order on asylum seekers who enter between ports of entry on a pending lawsuit ​​​​challenging a requirement that migrants use a smartphone app to submit applications.

  • June 07, 2024

    Vehicle Repair Co. Gets New Shot At Hiring H-2B Mechanic

    A maintenance and vehicle repair company will have another chance to apply for an H-2B certification for a diesel mechanic, a U.S. Department of Labor appeals board ruled, saying that a certifying officer arbitrarily anticipated the deadline for submission.

  • June 07, 2024

    Ex-Director In NYC Mayor's Office Charged With Bank Fraud

    A former director in the New York City Mayor's Office during the Bill de Blasio administration has been indicted on charges that he schemed to defraud over a dozen banks out of about $10 million using illegitimate fraud reports to induce reimbursements.

  • June 06, 2024

    5th Circ. Presses Feds On 'Perplexing' Razor Wire Arguments

    A three-judge Fifth Circuit panel had terse words Thursday for the government's argument that the court couldn't consider new facts on Texas' use of concertina wire at the border when deciding whether to issue a new injunction preventing federal agents from removing the wire, asking how it was "supposed to even react" to that claim during oral arguments

  • June 06, 2024

    7th Circ. Says Courts Can't Help Canadian Waive 10-Year Ban

    The Seventh Circuit on Thursday said its hands were tied on getting a Canadian man a quick decision on whether he can stay in the U.S. while he seeks to waive a requirement he stay abroad for 10 years.

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Expert Analysis

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • USCIS Fee Increases May Have Unintended Consequences

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    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ new fee schedule, intended to provide the agency with needed funds while minimizing the impact of higher fees on individual immigrants and their families, shifts too much of the burden onto employers, say Juan Steevens and William Coffman at Mintz.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

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