Massachusetts

  • June 12, 2024

    Nelson Mullins Partner's Widow Must Arbitrate Pay Dispute

    The estate of a Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP partner who died last year is bound by a partnership agreement that requires disputes to be resolved through arbitration, a Massachusetts judge said in dismissing a suit brought by the attorney's widow.

  • June 11, 2024

    Fed's New Internal Trading Policy Full Of Loopholes, Sens. Say

    Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Rick Scott, R-Fla., have called on Federal Reserve Board Chair Jerome Powell to repeal what they say is a "failed approach" to addressing allegedly illicit trading by Fed officials, saying the long-awaited policy is riddled with loopholes, contains weak penalties and requires no transparency for officials who violate the trading rules.

  • June 11, 2024

    Listing Co. Urges Court To Ignore DOJ's Broker Deal Issues

    A multiple listing service that has struck a $3 million settlement over broker commission rules told a Massachusetts federal court the changes proposed by the U.S. Department of Justice go far beyond what's required and would create an antitrust problem in the real estate industry.

  • June 11, 2024

    4 More States Join DOJ's Antitrust Suit Against Apple

    The attorneys general of Washington, Massachusetts, Nevada and Indiana on Tuesday became the latest to join the U.S. Department of Justice's antitrust lawsuit in New Jersey federal court claiming Apple is monopolizing the smartphone market.

  • June 11, 2024

    Raytheon Openly Prefers Younger Job Applicants, Suit Says

    Raytheon for years has violated age bias law by advertising positions explicitly meant for recent college graduates despite public statements acknowledging that the aerospace company needs thousands of additional workers, a 67-year-old job applicant alleged Tuesday in Massachusetts federal court.

  • June 11, 2024

    Ex-DraftKings Exec Seeks Fast Trial To Test Noncompete Law

    A former DraftKings executive wants a snap trial to unwind a noncompete blocking him from work at sports-betting rival Fanatics, calling the fiercely litigated, bicoastal dispute a "test case" for California's recent law reinforcing a ban on restrictive covenants.

  • June 11, 2024

    Foley & Lardner Accused Of Underpaying Recruiter

    A legal recruiter accused Foley & Lardner LLP in a Massachusetts state court lawsuit of taking advantage of a 13-year-old contract to pay it a "woefully insufficient" fee for helping to lure a multimillion-dollar partner from another firm earlier this year.

  • June 11, 2024

    ArentFox Adds 17-Person Team From Burns & Levinson

    A few months after adding a four-partner automotive team from Burns & Levinson LLP, ArentFox Schiff LLP on Tuesday announced the addition of 17 more attorneys and professionals from the firm with experience ranging from intellectual property matters to business litigation.

  • June 11, 2024

    Research Org, Ex-Workers Agree To End Retirement Fee Fight

    A research and development nonprofit agreed to settle a class action alleging it mismanaged its $3.5 billion employee retirement plans by allowing them to pay excessive administrative fees, according to a filing Tuesday in Massachusetts federal court.

  • June 11, 2024

    J&J Inks $700M Deal To End AGs' Talc Marketing Suits

    Forty-three state attorneys general on Tuesday said there has been a $700 million nationwide settlement and a consent judgment has been reached with Johnson & Johnson that ends claims it misled consumers about the safety of its talc products.

  • June 11, 2024

    Pepsi Bottling Partner Hit With Pollutant Lawsuit In Mass.

    A Massachusetts environmental advocacy group has followed through on plans to sue a bottler of Pepsi products over alleged violations of the Clean Water Act, but a lawyer for the Conservation Law Foundation says the organization is "optimistic" it will be able to resolve the issue.

  • June 10, 2024

    'Wicked Smart' Justice Sworn In To Mass. High Court

    If there's one thing that makes Supreme Judicial Court Justice Gabrielle Wolohojian uncomfortable, it's praise, former WilmerHale partner Peter Macdonald told an audience of hundreds of the jurist's colleagues, friends and family during a ceremonial swearing-in Monday evening.

  • June 10, 2024

    Mass. House Omits Local-Option Tax From $6B Housing Bill

    A proposal by Massachusetts Gov. Maura Healey to allow local-option transfer fees on high-value real estate sales was left out of a housing package worth more than $6 billion passed by the state House of Representatives. 

  • June 10, 2024

    Parexel Says Staffing Firm Liable For Temp's Alleged Fraud

    Clinical research company Parexel International says a Boston-based staffing agency is liable for damages caused by a rogue temporary employee who engaged in "egregious fraud" involving multiple drug trials, according to a complaint filed in Massachusetts state court.

  • June 10, 2024

    Kirkland Faces Class Claims Over Breach Of File Transfer Tool

    A proposed class of victims of a data breach has sued Kirkland & Ellis LLP and various other entities in a Massachusetts federal court, accusing them of failing to "properly secure and safeguard [the] plaintiff's and other similarly situated individuals' private information" in the lead-up to the massive 2023 MOVEit data breach.

  • June 10, 2024

    Duane Morris Rehires Employment Partner From Cooley

    A labor and employment attorney who spent nearly two decades at Duane Morris LLP has rejoined the firm after working at Cooley LLP the past few years.

  • June 10, 2024

    Medical-Aesthetic Device Rivals Set For Sept. Poaching Trial

    A Boston federal judge on Monday scheduled a post-Labor Day jury trial for medical-aesthetic device company Cynosure's $78 million poaching lawsuit against rival Reveal Lasers, urging the parties to streamline their exhibits and damages claims.

  • June 10, 2024

    Mass. Nursing Home To Pay Record $4M Over Neglect Claims

    A Massachusetts nursing home operator has agreed to pay a total of $4 million and hire an independent monitor to settle allegations that understaffing at its 16 facilities led to substandard care and patients being harmed, the attorney general’s office announced Monday. Next Step Healthcare LLC has agreed pay $750,000 directly to the state and dedicate the remaining $3.25 million toward increasing staffing levels.

  • June 07, 2024

    Real Estate Authority: EPA's Brownfield Funding Surge

    Catch up on this week's key developments by state from Law360 Real Estate Authority — including a new data series on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's brownfield grant program.

  • June 07, 2024

    Goodwin, Cooley Lead J&J-Backed Neurological Firm's IPO

    Johnson & Johnson-backed neurological firm Rapport Therapeutics Inc. rallied in debut trading Friday after it completed a $136 million initial public offering within its price range, guided by Goodwin Procter LLP and underwriters counsel Cooley LLP.

  • June 07, 2024

    Thomson Reuters Fired Worker For Anti-BLM Posts, Suit Says

    A former Thomson Reuters data scientist says he was fired after complaining about an allegedly racially hostile work environment toward white people, including the removal of his posts criticizing the Black Lives Matter movement from a company message board.

  • June 07, 2024

    Ex-Mass. Town Official Charged With Defrauding Pot Investors

    A former elected official in a Massachusetts town has been charged with raising nearly $500,000 from investors in two cannabis businesses he was starting, then using the funds to pay off debts from prior businesses, federal prosecutors announced Friday.

  • June 07, 2024

    Uber Can Arbitrate With Paralyzed Rider, Mass. Justices Rule

    Massachusetts' highest court on Friday ruled Uber Technologies Inc. had made its terms of service clear enough to move a paralyzed rider's case to arbitration, despite a dissent from one justice who said the company should spell out the rights that riders surrender when they hail a car.

  • June 07, 2024

    Cozen Adds Eckert Seamans Employment Pro In Boston

    Cozen O'Connor brought on a veteran employment lawyer from Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott LLC in Boston, who comes with experience working in the public sector that he said allows him to help companies navigate any type of employment suit that comes their way. 

  • June 06, 2024

    9th Circ. Tells Insurer To Cover Teen's Treatment Center Stay

    The Ninth Circuit has upheld a Massachusetts mother's win in her fight to get her insurer to cover behavioral health treatment for her son, ruling Thursday that a Washington federal judge was correct to order the insurer to cover her son's 14-month stay in a residential treatment center.

Expert Analysis

  • Regulatory Trends Offer 4 Lessons For Debt Relief Providers

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    A string of enforcement actions, including a New York lawsuit filed last month by seven states and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, underscore the regulatory scrutiny that debt relief and credit repair companies face and offer important lessons on telemarketing and deceptive practices compliance, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • 2 Emerging Defenses For Website Tracking Class Actions

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    Putative class actions premised on state wiretapping statutes that bar website activity tracking continue to be on the rise, but they are increasingly being dismissed on two procedural grounds, says Sheri Pan at ZwillGen.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • 5 Lessons For SaaS Companies After Blackbaud Data Breach

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    Looking at the enforcement actions that software-as-a-service provider Blackbaud resolved with state attorneys general, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Trade Commission in the past year can help SaaS companies manage these increasingly common forms of data breaches, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • A Refresher On Witness Testimony In 3 Key Settings

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    The recent controversy over congressional testimony from university presidents about antisemitism on campus serves as a reminder to attorneys about what to emphasize and avoid when preparing witnesses to testify before Congress, and how this venue differs from grand jury and trial proceedings, say Jack Sharman and Tyler Yarbrough at Lightfoot Franklin.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Debt Collector Compliance Takeaways From An FDCPA Appeal

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    A Consumer Financial Protection Bureau amicus brief last month in an ongoing First Circuit appeal focusing on an interpretation of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act can serve as a reminder for debt collectors to understand how their technologies, like bankruptcy scrubs and letter logic, can prevent litigation, says Justin Bradley at Womble Bond.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Googling Prospective Jurors Is Usually A Fool's Errand

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    Though a Massachusetts federal court recently barred Google from Googling potential jurors in a patent infringement case, the company need not worry about missing evidence of bias, because internet research of jury pools usually doesn’t yield the most valuable information — voir dire and questionnaires do, says Sarah Murray at Trialcraft.

  • Skirting Anti-Kickback Causation Standard Amid Circuit Split

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    Amid the federal circuit court split over the causation standard applicable to False Claims Act cases involving Anti-Kickback Statute violations, which the First Circuit will soon consider in U.S. v. Regeneron, litigators aiming to circumvent the heightened standard should contemplate certain strategies, say Matthew Modafferi and Terence Park at Frier Levitt.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

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